Category Archives: 2017 Human Rights Watch Film Festival

Nobody Speak: Trials of the Free Press

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July 19, 2017.  Although the “Human Rights Watch Film Festival” ended on June 18, I am still making my way through its many fine and important offerings.  The problem that can occur in writing about a film festival that has ended, is that I usually end up critiquing films that are not yet available to the public.  Fortunately, the documentary “Nobody Speak: Trials of the Free Press,” featured in the “Human Rights Watch Film Festival,” is already available on Netflix.  Netflix produced it, and more power to them for having done so!

 

“Nobody Speak” comes at a crucial time in our country’s history.  By now everyone has seen the re-purposed video, originally shot several years ago, of Donald Trump tackling someone to the floor as part of a World Wide Wrestling Federation stunt, during a wrestling match.  In the version “tweeted” by Trump this week, the CNN logo was superimposed over the face of the person being tackled.  Clearly the image symbolized that someone wealthy, and politically connected (Trump), could take down a media organization, a frightening thought, considering Trump’s railings against mainstream media.  This short clip, typical of the current level of antagonism toward the press at the highest levels of power, makes “Nobody Speak” even more relevant than it already was.

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2017 Human Rights Watch Film Festival “No Dress Code Required” (by guest blogger, Wendy Moscow)

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June 20, 2017.  I can’t imagine how anyone, even someone opposed to marriage equality, could fail to be moved by the love story of Victor and Fernando, a gay couple who only want the same protections and societal affirmation that are afforded mixed-sex couples in their city of Mexicali, Mexico. The documentary “No Dress Code Required” follows their two year struggle in nerve-wracking, suspenseful detail, as the City Registry applies every possible tactic to thwart their marriage – from a fabricated bomb threat, to invented anomalies in their witnesses’ signatures, to health testing required of no one else, to shutting down City Hall. The Mexicali officials are abetted by religiously inspired protesters who carry signs invoking Jesus and decrying some imagined threat to family values. But with every roadblock, Fernando and Victor become more doggedly determined, their ten year relationship growing stronger, their commitment deeper. Read the rest of this entry

2017 Human Rights Watch Film Festival “The Apology” (by guest blogger, Wendy Moscow)

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June 14, 2017.  “The Apology” is one of many amazing documentary films that are being screened during the Human Rights Watch Film Festival.

When “The Apology” opens, we see a group of elderly Korean women at a protest demonstration in Tokyo, Japan, peacefully demanding that the Japanese government apologize to them for their abduction and imprisonment as military sexual slaves during World War II. Japanese businessmen walk past shouting, “Go home Korean whores,” and worse, as the camera focuses on the dignified faces of these long-suffering victims. Needless to say, the apology is not forthcoming. Read the rest of this entry

The 2017 Human Rights Watch Film Festival

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June 6, 2017.  The 2017 Human Rights Watch Film Festival Film Festival, co-presented by the Film Society of Lincoln Center and IFC Center, will run from June 9-18. This will be the festival’s 28th edition.

John Biaggi, the festival’s creative director said, “In these trying times for human rights, this year’s festival lineup champions activism – from people demanding accountability and major reform in the US police and justice institutions, to Chinese workers battling an electronics giant’s unsafe working conditions, to Mayan women at the forefront of political accountability and change in Guatemala, to the remarkable work of digital activists in Brazil and Tibet. The festival highlights the outstanding work of activists at home and around the world, presenting a broad array of urgent human rights issues beyond those that command today’s headlines.” Read the rest of this entry