Blog Archives

Abacus: Small Enough to Jail

       

thomas-sung

Thomas Sung, the subject of “Abacus: Small Enough to Jail.” Photo by Sean Lyness

        May 16, 2017.  Last October I wrote an article about

 Abacus: Small Enough to Jail,” a documentary which was

shown as part of the New York Film Festival. While I

realize most readers might not have been able to

make it to the festival, how fortunate it is that this

excellent documentary will start a run at IFC Center

on Friday, May 19. Read the rest of this entry

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Abacus: Small Enough to Jail

thomas-sung

Thomas Sung, the subject of “Abacus: Small Enough to Jail.” Photo by Sean Lyness

October 01, 2016. “Abacus: Small Enough to Jail” is a gripping account of the, under reported, trial of the Abacus Federal Savings Bank, the only bank to have faced criminal charges in the wake of the 2008 financial crises. Even though much bigger banks participated in deliberate and massive mortgage fraud, no criminal indictments were every brought against them. They were bailed out by the tax payers because they were “too big to fail.” In other words, had they failed they would have wreaked havoc on the U.S. economy. So, they got a pass. Abacus, as the film’s title suggests, was small enough to pick on as the proxy for the much bigger banking corruption that was not, and apparently could not be, punished. Read the rest of this entry

The Donovan Affair at Film Forum 10/19/14 at 3:40

On Sunday 10/19/14 at 3:40, Film Forum will present a screening of director  Frank Capra’s 1929 film “The Donovan Affair.”  The film will be shown  as part of the repertory theatre’s current retrospective of Capra’s movies, which runs through  October 23.

Original poster for Frank Capra's THE DONOVAN AFFAIR (1929). CouI attended Tuesday’s screening of “The Donovan Affair.” It was a fun, riotous evening – a perfect blending of film history and really ingenious live performance.  “The Donovan Affair” is a rare event not to be missed. The story behind “The Donovan Affair” is nothing short of fascinating and Film Forum’s presentation of this nearly lost film represents a level of commitment to film restoration, repertory cinema, and performance that I do not think has ever been accomplished. Read the rest of this entry